DIY – Creating A Front Porch Welcome Post

Happy weekend everyone!  I am so excited to share this post with you.  I created these front porch welcome posts to sell in my booth at a local furniture show and they were a hit!  So…I wanted to share the build process with you.

Here is how I planned everything out… I have terrible handwriting, I know.  Also, ignore the pricing on these, I was trying to determine my cost for each (before paint and hardware) if I made 6.  I ended up having less than $15 total in each one and I sold them for $50 each!

**With the boards below, you could buy one of each and have enough materials to make at least 2 of these. If you purchase multiple 4″ x 4″s, you can make more.

Materials List

Quantity
Board Size
Notes
1
1″ x 8″
Cut at 7.5″
2
2″ x 6″
Cut at 5.5″
1
4″ x 4″
Cut at 36″ make sure it’s not pressure treated.  I had to go to 84 Lumber to get these.
1
2″ x 4″
Cut at 3.5″
1
1.5″ x 1.5″
Square wooden block (Hobby Lobby)
1
finial
Comes in package of 2 at Lowes
1
knob
I got mine at Hobby Lobby

Tools Needed:

  • Wood glue
  • Wood Screws (2″ and 2.5″)
  • Drill
  • Countersink bit
  • Saw
  • Measuring Tape
  • Pencil
  • Primer
  • Paint
Once you’ve made your cuts, you’ll be ready to start.  The lumber sizes are easy to find at any big box store… except the 4x4s that were not pressure treated.  As I said in the comments above, I purchased the 4″ x 4″s from 84 Lumber.  I called Lowes and Home Depot and all the ones they had were pressure treated.  84 Lumber is fairly close to my house and they had the untreated wood. They even loaded them in my truck for me and were absolutely fabulous to work with… AND they were cheaper, so I will definitely be going back again.
My helper below was inspecting every piece of wood I pulled out of the truck.  I love her!
The 4x4s were 8 feet long, so I was able to get two of the 36″ cuts out of each one and was left with a short scrap. I used my 10″ miter saw to make all of my cuts.  Cutting a 4×4 is pushing it with a 10″ saw, a few of my cuts didn’t go all the way through, so I had to flip them and cut the last bit then sand it down to make sure everything was even.  A larger saw would have been ideal, but it can be done with a 10″.  Just be sure to take all safety precautions and go slow.
Alright, let’s get building!

Step 1:  Build the Post

The order that you put this front porch post together matters.  You’ll want to first take your 4″ x 4″ post and attach the two 2″ x 6″ cuts (be sure to center the 4×4) using the 2.5 inch screws.  One 2″ x 6″at the top and one at the bottom.
I used my square and marked the center 4 inches as a guideline.  That way I could make sure the 4×4 was lined up.
I used my countersink bit and created 2 pilot holes that were diagonal to each other.  You have to use two screws on each piece.  Do you know why?  Your pieces will spin or shift if you don’t use two.  I also used a bit of wood glue on each for extra hold.  Here it is with one of the pilot holes drilled and the X is where my second went.  By countersinking the screws, you don’t have to worry about the screw heads sticking up and making a gap between your pieces.  I do not recommend using wood glue only.  It’s simply not strong enough for these heavy pieces of wood.

Step 2:  Attach the Base

Since both ends of your front porch post are the same, you can pick either to work with.  Secure the 1″ x 8″ base one of the ends.  Once again, I marked the center width to make sure everything lined up.
This will now be your base of the front porch post.  Create a countersunk pilot hole and attach with 2 of the 2″ wood screws.  Now, flip the post over so that the base is now on the ground.  You’ll be working on the top section next.

Step 3: 2″ x 4″

Attach the 2″ x 4″ to the center of the top 2″ x 6″ with two diagonal, countersunk 2.5″ wood screws.

Step 4:  Adding the Block

To attach the wooden block, I once again countersunk 2 diagonal screws.  I had to place them fairly close together so that when the finial was placed on top, the base of the finial would still hide the screw holes.  Be sure to leave space directly in the center of the wooden block so that you can attach your finial.

Step 5:  Finally the Finial

Your last build step is to attach the finial.  You’ll want to drill a pilot hole in the center of your wooden block.  Here is a picture of the block with the diagonal pilot holes and the center hole for the finial.
The finial comes with a screw already attached in center of the bottom.  Just screw it in to the center of the block and call this build complete!

Step 6:  Prime and Paint

Once the front porch post is put together, you can now prime and paint or stain the piece.  I chose to paint all of mine, so I ran over all of the edges first with sandpaper to make sure there would be no splinters later.  🙂  I then used 2 coats of spray primer to give these a good base and make sure that the paint doesn’t absorb right in to the wood.  Next, paint (I used outdoor spray paint) and let dry.

Step 7:  Attach Your Door Knob

Hobby Lobby has a great assortment of really cool door knobs.  I buy mine on the weeks when they are running the 50% off sale (it’s like every other week… seriously).  Here are a few that I picked up to use on my posts.

Just attach these on the top section of the 4″ x 4″ post.

Step 8:  Hang Your Sign and Enjoy!

Simple as that!  I had some left-over chalkboard pieces, so I cut them to size, drilled a hole in the top two corners and ran some twine through to make the holder.  I also took some leftover material and twisted it into these little flowers and glued them right in the corner of the chalkboard.

Until next time!
XOXO

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This post is linked up to the following FAB link parties:
DIY Showoff
Chic on a Shoestring
Thrifty Decor Chick
Remodelaholic

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